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20121201
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of florida and california did. you take redistricting out of the hands of legislators and put them in the hands of a public group nonpartisan group. it's worked in what for a long time and had some startling results in california and it's working in florida. this has been done by ballots. citizens rising up against their state legislatures and saying stop crewing around with our government. let's do it ourselves. >> this is what you saw with plan b, right? essentially this was the problem for boehner. true on both sides but why boehner was unable to get the votes that he needed for an alternative plan that was purely about a pr gimmick basically his members did not want to take a vote on something that wouldn't be real in the first place because of a fear of primary. because of the threats over the norquist pledge and threatening primary people so -- i agree with you in terms of the longer-term nonpartisan redistricting but in terms of the more immediate next couple of years i'm not sure how you change it. >> what does it say about boehner's leadership? i mean that was a pretty ext
marriages. they took up the proposition 8 case that banned gay marriage in california. they get the underlining question is gay marriage is a guaranteed right? >> peter finley dunn, great american humorist, his character famously said the supreme court follows the election returns. it came 31 days after election day in which three states for the first time endorsed same-sex marriage at the ballot box, never happened before, maine, maryland and the state of washington, the question is, how will that influence the court? it could make them say it's not necessary for us to go here. they don't want to do what they did with abortion. the court yanked the subject of public discourse. on the other hand, they could say it's now safe to look at this because there's something like an emerging consensus. the opposition of gay marriage is dying. >> james carville, right now at least, split the difference position that george argued, 41 states still outlaw gay marriage. >> right. it depends on whether they're going to allow this to happen. the election just matters in profound ways, look at
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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